Borrowed a multi-volume greatest funny moments of Mel Brooks from my public library. The listening experience has been a memory lane trip -variety shows,”show business” and Jewish children of immigrants, lived in the Bronx humor. [Note-if this still exists, please correct me.]

Listening to Mel Brooks when he was funny and when he was not made me think of and miss my father. My father told Jewish jokes. I didn’t think his jokes were funny [That’s not funny!]and went from non-reacting  to  saying so with increasing vehemence as I hit adolescence.

My father died in 1994, so it’s been a long time since I heard him tell a joke. Here are the two jokes I could remember.

Joke #1-a Passover story. Year #1

A new wife makes matzo ball soup for her husband. The matzo balls are light and fluffy.  The wife anxiously awaits her husband’s opinion as he lifts the spoon to his mouth.

Wife: What do you think?

Husband: Very good but not the way my mother used to make them

Year #2- “”

Wife: What do you think?

Husband: Very good but not the way my mother used to make them

Year #3-“” EXCEPT that by accident the bag of matzo meal falls into the bowl and the matzo balls are heavy as cannon balls. The wife considers starting from scratch and then thinks “what’s the point?”

The wife  not anxiously awaits her husband’s opinion as he lifts the spoon to his mouth.

Wife: What do you think?

Husband: NOW, that’s the way my mother used to make them!

Here’s another one of his jokes-his classic Mark Twain joke. When Mark Twain was a teenager, he said “gee my parents were dumb.” A few years later, he said “gee my parents have learned a lot in the past few years.”

Dad (and Mom], I take back my non-laughter; it’s never too late to get a joke 

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